Triumph Perfekt

Triumph PerfektWhen I hear the word Triumph, I’m thinking motorcycle. And no, if you’re wondering if this typewriter was made by Triumph Motorcycles of England, take a closer look at the spelling of perfect. That’s right, mein amigo, this typewriter was made in Germany. 

But there is one thing these two machines have in common — they fly! Just a touch of the throttle is all you’ll need on this typewriter. The keys are light and responsive. Besides the Torpedo typewriter, every German typewriter I’ve tried from the 1950s has the heavier carriage shift. But that’s about the only thing that’ll slow you down on the Perfekt. You’ll easily gain momentum with each silky return of the carriage. The handle stands out strong and catches perfectly in your fingers. And if you’re the type of writer who likes a handsome machine, the brown and beige curves are just stylish enough without being a distraction.

Sounding good so far? Well, here’s the downside, and perhaps I’m trolling in deeper waters for more exotic game, Triumph typewriters were not heavily exported from Germany. Which means you’ll most likely find them with the QWERTZ keyboard layout. If writing in English is your thing, you might need to rewire your brain. But if you’re not worried about producing final draft copy, let the Y and Z fall as they may. You’ll be able to figure out the meaning. But wait, Sherlock, you might’ve noticed the one in this review has the QWERTY layout. Indeed it does! Maybe that’s why I’m rather fond of this typewriter. It’s got the great guts of German engineering with the finger friendly Americano layout, or wherever English is written.

Lastly, you might be wondering, how does it compare with its more well known cousin, the Olympia SM3? While the vaunted SM3 is mechanical perfection, the Perfekt feels more responsive, the carriage a tad lighter. And like the SM3, it’s loud compared to the quiet Americans. Then again, the Germans never promised silence and perhaps wanted their typewriters to stand out from the crowd. Get the thick felt pad and you’ll cut the decibels in half.


  1. You really don’t like the carriage shift! Getting accustomed to the QWERTZ keyboard isn’t that bad. In some ways, I actually prefer it. If someone is hesitant about buying a pristine German machine because of the QWERTZ layout, I tell them to just get it. The rest of the machine will more than compensate.

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